Tag Archives: The Phantom Lady of Paris by Calvin Davis

WHY?

Why do people get tattooed? Wait. Before you answer, let me caution you that whatever reply you give, is certain to tell a lot about your age. If you’re over, say forty or fifty, you will probably reply those who get tattooed are of the underclass, individuals on the fringes of society. Further, you’ll probably mention that tattooing is a common practice among sailors, etc.

Now, if you’re much younger than the age group mentioned above, you’ll probably reply “Why do people get tattooed? is a loaded question. And if you are young and smart you will add that the word “tattooed” should not be part of the question. Why? Because it carries with it all kinds of negative connotations. Today there is a new expression for “tattoo.” The modern expression is “body art.”

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Now, let’s rephrase the original question to read, “Why do people adorn their bodies with art?” See? That’s a different question, isn’t it? Those who are less set in their beliefs will probably be happy to answer that query by saying “Perhaps such people are artistic by nature, and they love art, and they wish to share their love of art with the world. Or perhaps they feel good art, like good music, changes people for the better.”

For some, especially men, there is the allure of tribal tats. Ink applied in various tribal designs over the shoulder, across the pectoral muscles or a half or full-sleeve down the arm.

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The point is, we look at human existence through either old lens or new ones. Sadly, some are duped into never changing their lens, never realizing that yesterday was yesterday and today is today.

Which lens do you use? Which ones do I use? Sometime I have to check myself because, though I don’t mean to, I use the wrong lens. I met a middle-aged mother last week who had butterflies inked on her shoulder with the name of each of her three daughters in each butterfly. It was beautiful.  I’m on alert most of the time to body art and I change.

Do you?

Trust me, with the right glasses, the world comes into sharper focus. Using the correct lens you’ll see the difference between what was and what…is.

~Calvin Davis is also the author of THE PHANTOM LADY OF PARIS.

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One of the World’s Shortest Short Stories

classifiedLiza’s Classified Ad

gown

For Sale —  One white wedding dress, size 8, never used. One engagement ring, beautiful, worn two months. Two hundred wedding invitations: backs are blank; make excellent scratch pads. Interested party call 555-6759 and leave a message. Will return call tomorrow…if I make it through the night. Liza

 

Calvin Davis is also the author of The Phantom Lady of Paris, a love story set in the City of Light during the turbulent late 1960’s.

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My New Profession by Calvin Davis

When a man reaches the age of eighty-two, as I have, he has a lot of memories. Some cherished. Some he’d sooner forget. Like the time I got sent to the principal’s office for…well, like I said… some memories a person would sooner forget.

schoolLet’s talk about jobs for a few minutes, shall we? I held a lot in my early years—paper boy, shoe-shine boy, golf caddy, department store stock boy. After a stint in the Army and earning my Masters, I entered the teaching world where I stayed for nearly forty years. Teaching English to high school students was a great joy in my life. Attending teachers’ meetings, not so much.

Through all those years, I wrote. Retirement meant I could spend nearly every hour of my day writing. Sheer heaven.

Then something unexpected happened. My wife mentioned she’d like to write, too, yet she lacked the courage, the resolution to do so.

Suddenly I took on a new job.

Cheerleader.

WhittierRedskins_sNow I’ve always taken pride in a job well-done. As a young boy, my newspapers were always delivered on time. When I shined shoes, my customers always sauntered away happy, able to see their reflection in the tops of their shoes. My students loved the unit on Shakespeare. Perhaps it was my jumping onto the top of the desk to deliver soliloquies that kept their attention. So was I a good cheerleader for my wife? She had eight titles published and two contracts for two series from two different Big Six publishers.

So, what do I get for all my efforts? Lots more hugs and kisses. And the best part? I don’t have to wear one of those silly cheerleader uniforms. At eighty-two, my arthritic knees are not a pretty sight, but my wife’s happy face is.

~~~~ Calvin Davis is author of The Phantom Lady of Paris.

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Second Wind now at Shakespeare and Company in Paris

Today, along the banks of the Seine, on a tiny street called Rue de la Bûcherie, sits a literary institution: Shakespeare and Company.

9425782709_7f65b8d096_nIn more historical times, the original bookstore by this name occupied a different spot from 1921 until the Nazi invasion of Paris. This creative haven was owned and operated by Sylvia Beach, supporter for the arts and artists of The Lost Generation. She encouraged Hemingway and Picasso, just to name a few, and also published James Joyce’s Ulysses, at a great personal expense to her financial funds.

In 1952, American George Whitman opened an English speaking bookstore along the Seine, catty-cornered from the Notre Dame Cathedral on the opposite side of the river. In honor of Sylvia Beach, he used her bookstore’s name…and, years later, named his newborn daughter Sylvia, too.

As a young lad, George Whitman backpacked over Central and South America long before the activity was as popular as it is now. He was deeply impressed by natives who opened their homes to him, giving him a dry, warm spot to sleep and a nourishing meal. After opening his bookstore, he started the same tradition. Over the years, he provided lodging (a cot stuck in an out of the way spot) and free meals to struggling artists and writers. In return they had to read a book a day and work two hours in the store. It’s reported he helped over 40,000 would-be authors, poets and artists before he died at the age of 91. He called these guests “tumbleweeds.”

Paris-Day 7 026Today, his daughter runs the bookstore, carrying on her father’s legacy. Shakespeare and Company is known worldwide. And I’m proud to say Second Wind has a tiny spot there. My PHANTOM LADY OF PARIS is now part of their inventory and is also included in their lending library on the second floor.  My book. like all those purchased at this Paris institution, will bear the famous stamp of this bookstore visited by travelers from across the globe.

Shakespeare stamp

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