Tag Archives: Paul Mohrbacher

March 29th is Festival of Smoke and Mirrors Day

Celebrate Festival of Smoke and Mirrors Day!

Grab a book from Second Wind Publishing

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A Spark of Heavenly Fire by Pat Bertram

The Red Death has quarantined the state of Colorado and the dead start to outnumber the living. Reporter Greg Pullman investigates and against the backdrop of chaos, he falls in love with Kate Cummings. Will he discover the source of the disease before it’s too late for the woman he loves?
Also by Pat Bertram: Daughter Am I , Grief: The Great Yearning , Light Bringer and More Deaths Than One

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The Magic Fault by Paul Mohrbacher

The theft of the Shroud of Turin turns the Catholic Church upside down. Only one clue is left and its obscurity baffles all: the relic will head off a disaster of epic proportion.

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False Positive by J J Dare

It all started when Joe Daniels’ wife is involved in a terrible automobile crash. Nothing is as it seems as Joe battles faceless enemies in an effort to discover the truth behind his wife’s “accident.”
Also from J J Dare: False World

http://www.secondwindpublishing.com

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July 14th is Bastille Day! Celebrate the Revolution with Second Wind Publishing Suspense Novels!

On July 14, 1789, the people rose against the French monarchy and stormed the Bastille prison. Here’s another revolutionary idea: grab one of these thrillers from Second Wind Publishing:

😯

The Magic Fault by Paul Mohrbacher

The theft of the Shroud of Turin turns the Catholic Church upside down. Only one clue is left and its obscurity baffles all: the relic will head off a disaster of epic proportion.

😯

False Positive by J J Dare

It all started when Joe Daniels’ wife is involved in a terrible automobile crash. Nothing is as it seems as Joe battles faceless enemies in an effort to discover the truth behind his wife’s “accident.”
Also from J J Dare: False World

http://www.secondwindpublishing.com

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Interview with Paul Mohrbacher, Author of The Magic Fault

What is your book about?

The Magic Fault takes place in 2004 in Turin, Italy, where the Catholic Church’s most revered relic has been stolen by a mysterious sect from the city’s cathedral. An American professor who studies magical thinking uncovers a baffling series of answers to the question, Why?

How long had the idea of your book been developing before you began to write the story?

The idea blossomed in 2004, and the writing started within months.

What inspired you to write this particular story?

The inspiration came from being in Turin, Italy, during a festival of food sponsored by the International Slow Food movement. Just a few miles from the festival is the church where the Shroud of Turin is honored. It was the confluence of the two events, one celebrating life on and in the earth, the other the afterlife and its promise of a future life after-earth. Putting the two themes together was an inspiring challenge.

Who is your most unusual/most likeable character?

The most unusual character is an elderly Parisienne who is protecting a secret. She is based on a woman I met some years back who lived through WW II as a resistance fighter. She was an incredibly still-beautiful woman who smoked strong French cigarettes and climbed mountains. I may bring her back in another book some day.

How long did it take you to write your book?

I spent six years writing The Magic Fault.

How much of the story did you have in mind before you started writing it?

I found I first had to describe the plot to friends. By talking about it I got in touch with what I wanted to say in the story. I needed to know the plot well enough before I could choose my characters. Then the characters started telling me how they would react in the situations I put them in. As usual, they talked too much; I tossed everything into the first few drafts and then crawled exhausted to an editor who found a way to cut and trim and guide me back to the story line.

Did you do any research for the book? If so, how did you do it? (searching Internet, magazines, other books, etc.)

Given the topic, there was a lot of research; mainly books on the subject. The Internet was a major source for fact-checking. I made visits to some of the sites described in the book, and had heavy email contact with sources who lived in places I couldn’t visit. Finally, the New York Times always had a story that nudged me when I was writing something related.

How do you develop and differentiate your characters?

There is pre-writing and there is post-writing. I differentiate characters by “sleeping” with them, every last one of them. I write something and then wait for the characters to knock on my head in the night. They finally come alive after many nights spent in their company (dreams, waking up and writing down some dialogue or action, etc.). They point me on the right path on how they would act and think in the story I want to tell.

How (or when) do you decide that you are finished writing a story?

The book is done when my characters’ involvement in the story seems fully realized.

What challenges did you face as you wrote this book?

Balancing a day job with writing on a weekly basis was a huge challenge. I finally changed my job to four days a week instead of five. Those three-day weekends make a difference, especially if two of the days are more or less filled with other chores or getaways.

What’s your writing schedule like? Do you strive for a certain amount of words each day?

My writing schedule varied with the stages of development of the book. Early in the book I wrote on a couple of weekday early mornings and then also on weekends. Usually my computer went with me on vacations and I wrote daily. Rewriting was more episodic, hit and run, because I spent more time thinking how the story held together. When I found an agent and began heavy editing and rewriting, I imposed a rule for myself; get the agent the latest version as soon as you can. Write whenever one finds time; deadline writing.

What is the most difficult part of the whole writing process?

The most difficult part of the writing process is cutting out extraneous plot detours. That usually means characters you like but who shouldn’t be in this book; scenes that seem essential but aren’t, dialogue that explains more than it should. The “aha moment” comes at the right time, about halfway through the first draft — where am I going with this story? And usually it’s an editor who taps me on the head with the question.

Where can people learn more about you and The Magic Fault?

From my publisher’s website: Second Wind Publishing/Paul Mohrbacher

See also:
Chapter One of The Magic Fault
Excerpt from The Magic Fault

Click here to buy: The Magic Fault

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Celebrating Four New Releases from Second Wind Publishing!

To celebrate these releases, we have three contests/giveaways/chances to win books. Choose your favorite, or enter all of them! All events end on April 15, 2011, so hurry!!

1. a writing contest: If you could write a letter and send it back through time to yourself, at age eight, what would you say to your younger self? J. Conrad Guest will select the best ones and award those letter writers inscribed copies of One Hot January. Click here for the rules and to submit your entry: What Would You Say to Your Eight-Year-Old Self?

2. a quiz: One person, randomly chosen from all correct entries, will win an ecopy of all four newly released books. (To be downloaded at Smashwords.com). Click here for the quiz: Take this Quiz and Win Books!

3. a giveaway:  leave a comment on this post telling us which newly released book (or books) you would like to read, and you might win that ebook! Four people chosen at random from all commenters will win an ebook of their choice to be downloaded from Smashwords in their preferred format.

Your choices of books for the giveaway:

Light Bringer: Becka Johnson had been abandoned on the doorstep of a remote cabin in Chalcedony, Colorado when she was a baby. Now, thirty-seven years later, she has returned to Chalcedony to discover her identity, but she only finds more questions. Who has been looking for her all those years? Why are those same people interested in fellow newcomer Philip Hansen? Who is Philip, and why does her body sing in harmony with his? And what do either of them have to do with a shadow corporation that once operated a secret underground installation in the area?

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In One Hot January, Joe January, an emotionally aloof private investigator from the South Bronx, gets more than he bargains for when he uncovers this seemingly impossible plot of time travel and alternate realities by grudgingly agreeing to help a pretty young woman locate her missing father. Her father, a Professor of Archeology from Columbia College, must prevent the secret location of Hitler’s body, which lies in a cryogenic state awaiting a cure for cancer, from falling into the wrong hands. By the end of the novel, January is thrust one hundred years into the future, where he must survive on a century-old sagacity as he endeavors to find his way back to his own time and the woman he loves but lacked the courage to tell. The tale concludes in January’s Thaw, to be released later this year.

The Magic Fault unfolds in Turin, Italy, where the Catholic Church’s most revered relic has been stolen by a mysterious sect from the city’s cathedral.  The theft occurs during the 2004 Salone del Gusto, Turin’s celebration of “good, clean, and fair food” sponsored by the international Slow Food Movement. Tom Ueland, an American Midwest college history professor and journalist who writes about magical thinking, is in Turin to vacation with a friend, Rachel Cohen, an exhibitor at the celebration.  He’s also there at the invitation of the Turin archbishop, himself a student of magical thinking.  Tom takes up the chase after the Shroud of Turin and is spun toward a resolution he never sees coming.

More Than a Governess: Becky Thorn has been keeping a secret for more than seven years. A secret that, if found out, could destroy her. So before she gets too ensconced in London society, she accepts a position as a governess for a reclusive Viscount and his wife, far away from the ton.

Stephen Hastings, the third Viscount Hastings, is nothing short of perturbed when the tart Miss Thorn shows up on his doorstep. He is a man with little time and even less patience, who feels his pushover housekeeper is doing a fine job keeping his wards out of his hair. But Miss Thorn thinks differently and needles her way into becoming his governess, and eventually, the object of his affection.

Read the first chapters of these books at: The Exciting Worlds of Second Wind Books.

For even more fun, click on the covers and you will find a surprise!

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Take this Quiz and Win Books!

For all questions, answer
A for Light Bringer by Pat Bertram
B for More Than a Governess by Jerrica Knight-Catania
C for The Magic Fault by Paul Mohrbacher
D for One Hot January by J. Conrad Guest

If you don’t know the answers to the following questions, (or don’t want to guess) you can find most but not all of the answers by clicking on the above links. One person, randomly chosen from all correct entries, will win an ecopy of all four books. (To be downloaded at Smashwords.com). Send your responses to secondwindpublishing@gmail.com before April 15, 2011 to be considered for this special prize.

Hint: five questions pertain to each book.

  1. This book has been described as the world’s longest parable.
  2. The main character of this book is a Midwestern college history professor.
  3. This story takes place in London.
  4. This book is about getting a second chance at starting over.
  5. One of the main characters in this book is short of time and short of patience.
  6. The main character of this book is described as an indignant Humphrey Bogart
  7. This book features a ghost cat. Or is something other than a ghost?
  8. This book is a regency romance.
  9. This story takes place in Colorado.
  10. The stolen object in this story could have repercussions for the Catholic Church.
  11. This is the fourth novel by this author to be published by Second Wind Publishing.
  12. This book is written in the style of Raymond Chandler.
  13. This book is best described as speculative fiction.
  14. This story is about the theft of a famous relic.
  15. This book takes place in alternate realities and features time travel.
  16. This story takes place in New York.
  17.  This is the first book by this author to be published by Second Wind Publishing.
  18. This story takes place in Italy.
  19. This book is part of a published series.
  20.  The heroine of this story is a servant. Or is she?

Now you are intrigued! If you want to know more, you can find the first chapter of all four books at: The Exciting Worlds of Second Wind Books

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The Magic Fault by Paul Mohrbacher

The Magic Fault unfolds in Turin, Italy, where the Catholic Church’s most revered relic has been stolen by a mysterious sect from the city’s cathedral. The theft occurs during the 2004 Salone del Gusto, Turin’s celebration of “good, clean, and fair food” sponsored by the international Slow Food Movement. Tom Ueland, an American Midwest college history professor and journalist who writes about magical thinking, is in Turin to vacation with a friend, Rachel Cohen, an exhibitor at the celebration. He’s also there at the invitation of the Turin archbishop, himself a student of magical thinking. Tom takes up the chase after the Shroud of Turin and is spun toward a resolution he never sees coming.

The Magic Fault will resonate with people who love the drama of European history, with those who follow religious debates, and with people passionate about where and how the world’s food is grown. Mystery lovers will have fun trying to figure out the resolution before the protagonist does. And the “magic” theme adds to the mystery.

Excerpt:

He never would have been in that church yesterday if not for one other person. A month earlier, he had received a letter from the archbishop of Turin, a priest named Michael Tucci. Tucci had read an article on magical thinking in the New York Times arts section. In the article, Tom had been quoted as an authority on the topic. He summarized the Historian Norman Cantor’s insights into medieval behavior during the Black Plague of the 14th Century: Christians blamed the Jews for the plague. “Scapegoating is magical thinking,” Tom wrote. “And it goes on today. We blame the ‘other’ for everything wrong in our lives. Religious extremists are often the worst offenders.”

The priest wrote that he was deeply fascinated by the topic and invited him to Turin. Tom wrote back he’d be there in a month. Yesterday was to be the day for the meeting. Tom had decided to check out the famed Shroud of Turin relic first.

Now it looked as though he might not get to see the priest. Next stop: The U.S. consulate in Turin, if there was one. And he needed a lawyer.

Another knock on the door; the big guy barged in and spoke actually using nouns and verbs. “The archbishop of Turin wants to see you.”

Tom looked at his watch — 7 a.m. The cop had brought him a shaving kit, a cappuccino and a bag of fresh bread and rolls. “Get dressed, please, and I will be back in thirty minutes.” “Please” meant something for sure — he was cleared.

“It’s about time. Is it a trial, the inquisition, what the hell is going on?”

The big cop had undergone a personality change from the night before. He even looked smaller. “The archbishop will meet you in the Duomo. The scene of the crime. Then of course, if all goes well, you are free to go about your business in Torino.”

***

The Magic Fault is Paul Mohrbacher’s first venture into genre fiction. His writing career began as a playwright. His first script for the stage, The Chancellor’s Tale (The Dramatic Publishing Company), won first prize in the 1991 Julie Harris Playwright Award Competition and has received numerous productions and readings. Born in Duluth, Minnesota, he was a Catholic priest for 16 years. He lives with his wife, Ruth Murphy, in St. Paul, surrounded by grandchildren.

(Photo by Andrea Cole Photography)

See also:
Chapter One of The Magic Fault
Interview with Paul Mohrbacher

Click here to buy: The Magic Fault

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