Tag Archives: Artistic

Craela’s Omar & Yasmeen

I’m still in my grateful mode, dear readers and this month I’d like to give tribute to a very special human being, who was an extremely talented person, and who just happened to be my mother-in-law. Her name was Craela and she was one of those rare people whom everybody loved. I adored her.

Craela

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

She was the manager of an ice cream store in Overland, Missouri, which is a suburb of St. Louis and every time my husband had leave from the military, we’d pack up the car, gather our son and dog and head in that direction to visit, stopping at Velvet Freeze Ice Cream store on the way in.  Hubby and I always had a hot fudge sundae and, Rob, our son, had bubble gum ice cream, you know, with the tiny chiclet type pieces of bubble gum in it. And when Rob was small, his name for Craela was Nano

Inside Velvet Freeze, Craela had drawn posters in colored markers of her customers, especially the “apple cheeked children” and had them displayed all over the store. She knew everybody’s name and everything about their families and what kind of ice cream they liked. People flocked from all over the area to go there. I was always amazed she could remember them all.

Craela loved to paint in oils and later in Acrylics and she’d often give newlyweds a painting of hers as a wedding gift. Her style was really unique and hinted on fantasy and sometimes her subjects were humorous and somewhat cartoony. I remember one Christmas she’d hand-blown eggs and painted the shells to look like each member of the family. They were personalized Christmas ornaments on her tree and were really beautiful and so remarkable. And the neatest thing about them was that they looked exactly like each of us!

One year she made me one of those kitchen witches that were so popular years ago. I still have mine hanging in my kitchen. The witch is supposed to keep away gremlins that like to misplace things, but I think mine has gotten lazy. Anyway, she’s so unique and I love the way she looks! What do you think?

Nano’s Kitchen Witch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But I think the crowning glory of the things Craela made me over the years was a doll named Yasmeen. She was a Christmas gift and in the box with her was the story of Yasmeen’s life. It told of how Yasmeen has searched the world over for her beloved and would continue to search until she found him. The next gift was Omar, Yasmeen’s beloved. They met, fell in love and are now forever together. I found an exotic looking chair painted it gold and decorated it with jewels for a dance show I was in and it is where Omar and Yasmeen like to stay now. They reside in my bedroom and as I look at them every day, I’m amazed again and again that Craela just dreamed up these dolls and made them completely out of her imagination. She even used real eyelashes for Yasmeen and toe rings for her feet, harem pants and a jewel in her navel. And Omar has rings on his fingers, removable shoes and a turban on his head. Absolutely amazing!!!!

 

Omar & Yasmeen

 

 

Omar & Yasmeen

 

 

Sadly, Craela left this world in 1993 and I’ll always miss her, but I’m so grateful I have such fantastic memories of her. In fact, my son and I were talking about her just yesterday. And since my former sister-in-law and I have remained friends through the years, we can reminisce together about a truly precious person.

Do you have a special person that has influenced you in your life? I’d love to hear.

 

Coco Ihle is the author of SHE HAD TO KNOW, an atmospheric traditional mystery set mainly in Scotland. Please join her here each 11th of the month.

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Artistic New Port Richey, FL

New Port Richey, with a population of approximately 15,000, is about 35 miles northwest of Tampa in Pasco County on the Gulf of Mexico. One to two story buildings comprise the main thoroughfare which is lined with street lights topped by old-time glass globes, adding charming ambiance to mainly small businesses and restaurants, and much of the architecture of years ago has been preserved. The Pithlachascotee River (try to say that three times fast!) meanders through the downtown area with a river walk for visitors and residents alike to enjoy. In the 1920’s, New Port Richey was gaining a reputation as the Hollywood of the East, since many famous people and movie stars visited and bought homes here. The depression years changed that and it remained a small, but lovely city.

Over the last several years artists have been encouraged to paint historic themed murals on the downtown buildings and I recently decided to walk around and take pictures. What was originally to be a photographic exercise turned out to be a relaxing and delightful afternoon’s stroll of discovery.

Some of the murals had a whimsical feel, others were a tromp l’oeil experience. I had the feeling some of the likenesses were of past leaders of the community, people with whom I was unfamiliar, but it didn’t matter. If that were true, I was glad they were recognized.

I returned home feeling pleased I live in such a creative community, a place where people value history and the arts. I felt inspired to try being creative in some way too. I felt happy.

Does something about your community inspire you or make you happy?

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What Makes An Artist?

“Hey, Ruby, where is your fish?”

Six different colored koi and a smaller goldfish.

The fish they were referring to was a clay sculpture of a Koi that was about 3 feet long and weighed 30 pounds or more. It had been pit fired and had some nice blacks and reds on the white clay. Ruby had it for sale at every Christmas and Mother’s Day sale for the past 4 years.

“Oh, I sold that,” Ruby said, “so now I’m a real artist.”

It was a nice piece. Not to my taste, but that’s not the point. I don’t know what she got for it, but I wanted say, “Selling one sculpture doesn’t make you an artist, it makes you a merchant.” I didn’t say that, of course, but I wanted to.

But it got me to thinking – when does the artist become the merchant and vice versa? I have a friend that I think is a very good painter. He gets a reasonable amount of commissions and teaches at the college. I ran into him at the mall and said, “Well, Well, if it isn’t Norm the artist.”

His response was, “I’m a painter. That’s for sure. Whether or not I’m an artist we won’t know for another 50 to 100 years.”

His remark got me to thinking. What makes an artist? It is more than just loving to paint, or play an instrument, or even being artistic. There’s a big difference between being artistic and being an artist. Nor is it just loving art and involving yourself in some creative process.

I love working with clay but I know I will never be a ceramic artist. Someone said to me when I gave her a small sculpture I had made, “Oh, Paul, you’re such an artist.”

My response was, “No, my dear, at over 80 years of age I have neither the strength or the energy nor the 20 to 30 years it takes to be an artist.”

What does it take to be an artist? First I think it takes a love for what you are doing so for 20 to 30 years you immerses yourself in the medium, whatever that may be; painting, clay, stone, wood, violin, piano, guitar or whatever. But just that is not enough. Added to that dedication there has to be talent. And, I hate to say this, but a little bit of luck, or maybe a great deal of luck.

So, now that I’ve told you what I think an artist is, what is art? A ceramics student asked me the other day, “What is art?” My answer was, “Art is anything that enhances your world.” I think that’s true to an extent, whether it is a bridge or well-prepared food. In the visual arts for me it is something I look at and then have to go back and look at again. If after I’ve walked away it comes back to mind, then it is art, and the person who created it is an artist.

The Mona Lisa.

Almost everybody is familiar with the Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci. Even as you read this the painting comes to mind. That is Art.

Three of my favorite artists are Salvador Dali, Norman Rockwell and Andrew Wythe. They are three very different painters and it is wonderful the strange times their paintings will come to mind. For Dali it is the melting clocks.

Rockwell did covers for Saturday Evening Post, The New Yorker, painted presidents and other famous people but the one that comes to mind is a painting entitled, “Outward bound.” It has an old sailor, a boy and a dog sanding on shore looking at a departing ship.

"Christina's World" by Andrew Wyeth

With Andrew Wyeth it is “Christina’s world.” There is just something about that girl sitting in the field looking at the barn that haunts me, in a nice way, but for me there is something haunting about that painting.

As for me, well, My dear, I will never be an artist, but that doesn’t prevent me from loving to play in mud.

I told someone the other day, “You see I have a habit and selling my pottery supports my habit. My habit is writing.” I may not be an artist, but damn, I’m having fun pretending.

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Paul’s book The Telephone Killer published by 2nd Wind Publishing is now available on Amazon and from the publisher. Kindle and Nook versions just $4.99.

Since everything is copyrighted please feel free to re blog any of my posts.

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