A Teachable Moment Sadly Lost by Calvin Davis

It happened so quickly I didn’t realize it was there before it vanished, never to return, at least not with the same person. Where did it happen? In our doctor’s office. I accompanied my spouse for her regular appointment. The physician suggested that Vonnie should take a test that would require her to stay in a hospital overnight. Hearing that, she frowned as if she had just downed a gallon of vinegar.

“Oh, no, I can’t do that. I would have to be separated from my husband for a night. I wouldn’t be able to sleep.” Judging from the stunned expression on the medical man’s face, he was befuddled by her response. Why, he no doubt wondered, can’t you spend one night away from your spouse? After all, I’m not suggesting you two get a divorce.

wedding bandsI sat there listening in silence. Later I hated myself for not explaining to the doctor what my wife meant when she said she didn’t want to spend a night away from her husband.

I should have said the following: “Doctor, my wife and I are inseparable. We do everything together. Each night we go to sleep in each other’s arms. We laugh at the same jokes. Cry when watching the same movies. And have learned to communicate with each other without saying a word. A glance is enough. A sigh. A movement of the shoulders. An eloquent touching of the chin with a finger. A smile. A wink. A laugh. And let’s not forget her coming to me, complaining that she hasn’t had a hug all day for the fifteenth time. It’s a guaranteed laugh maker.

But I said none of these things. Also I didn’t tell him that occasionally Vonnieholding hands and I read an article about some couple that has been married for forty or fifty years, and that they die on the same day, almost the same hour. If my wife and I departed this life at almost the same time, we would have no fear of dying. We’d exit with a smile, aware that neither would be left behind to pine the death of the other. If we died on the same day, we would have no fear of death. We would see death not as a terminator, but as a unifier, joining Vonnie and me for all eternity. We would never have to separated again…not even for a night.

Calvin Davis is also the author of The Phantom Lady of Paris.

2 Comments

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2 responses to “A Teachable Moment Sadly Lost by Calvin Davis

  1. How beautiful, and how beautifully expressed. Thank you.

  2. It wasn’t totally lost. You shared it with us. Thank you, Calvin. I think you and Vonnie are a bit rare. It’s heartening to see such love exists. Bless you both.

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